Brent Hill and Underhill Tor

My first walk of 2020 and I wanted to work my way back into walking. I hadn’t walked properly since the day before the general election (the 11th Dec), not for any protest reason, but because the weather was very poor in that time and I had been rota’d into far too many shifts for my liking over Christmas. Well no more of that for me as I start a new job in the first week of the new year! This walk is a simple one, with a bit extra, the walk up Brent Hill is very simple, up the lane on the west side of the hill, hang a right up a track when you are level with the summit and then enjoy the view. Well the weather was pretty gloomy, making any distance views a no go, instead on the way down I picked off Lutton Tor and Underhill Tor to make it a bit more interesting, before joining an old path on the eastern side of the hill which is either out of bounds or the farmer wants to persuade you not to go that way anymore, hence the tying up of the gate at the summit. However as you can see from my photos the path is clear on that side and it continues to the road at the bottom. After this walk I felt really good and planned two more walks for the next two days, I’d got my walking mojo back.

Start – South Brent
Route – Lydia Bridge – Lutton – Brent Hill – Lutton Tor – Underhill Tor – South Brent
Distance – 2.5 miles    Start time – 11.30pm    Time taken – 2hrs    Highest Point – Brent Hill 311metres
Weather – Cold, damp, drizzle, misty

© Crown copyright 2019 Ordnance Survey FL 2019 SF

South Brent church, St Petroc’s. That’s Ugborough Beacon back right. Probably the hill most in view on this walk

Cross over the railway line, then drop down to the left, or go under the tunnel below the line

I’d followed the river Avon for a short distance after crossing the railway line in order to arrive at Lydia bridge. A very pretty spot in summer with the sun shining

I’d climbed up on to the bridge road to take this photo of the waterfalls beyond the bridge

I walked back along the road then turned left and uphill. Before long a gateway gives you a view to Ugborough Beacon again

Further along and a view along the Avon valley. That’s Grippers Hill at the far end

Turning right to go up Brent Hill I pass these cows.

This photo is taken looking back down the track to Brent Hill. Three Barrows is back left

To the north east towards Rippon Tor

I’d hopped over the fence to take this photo of the trig and the views into Dartmoor

That’s the remnants of the old iron age fort on the left. South Hams stretching away beyond

Back on the west side of the fence and dropping down now. Again the Avon valley cuts from bottom left across to the right on the photo. And a rain shower passes across Grippers Hill

Not far from the summit of Brent Hill and just after the lower outcrop of Brent Hill is this tor. Lutton Tor sits just inside the trees

Lutton Tor

Dropping back down from Lutton Tor, turning left and following the path to a broken gate, pass through that and after 50 metres up into the trees brings you here. This is Underhill Tor and if you climb up the outcrop

The top rock of Underhill Tor and the misty view north east

That’s South Brent down there. You would normally see Plymouth from here as well, but not today

Now running through the middle of Underhill Tor is a wall. I got down from the tor then went over the wall, a short distance after that was a fence, over that brings you to this path. As you can see it is well trod, and is a path, follow it all the way down and left to the road gate

A train on the track

Once back down you pass this fine house. The river Avon and the path I took to Lydia bridge is just left of the house behind the bushes

Back at the railway. The car park is behind the building on the right. A fine walk and I was ready for more by the time I got back to the car. At home I’d planned two more walks over the next two days. Bring ’em on.

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