Broadsands to Paignton

A short walk today mainly due to the heavy rain forecast to arrive around midday at home. I headed east to try and extend that time a bit and actually found an area that missed the worst of the rain, whilst I was there anyway. I’ve walked from here with the boys last November around to Brixham (here), so this walk extends my unbroken completed part a bit further. This isn’t the most exciting part of the coastal path however it does have the Dartmouth Steam railway running alongside it, which is rather nice. I finished this section at Paignton harbour and sat and had a coffee before looping back along a main road to Broadsands. A nice little walk which served it purpose before I watched England lose at penalties again, still the new football season isn’t far away and pre season starts this week!

Start – Broadsands

Route – South West Coastal Path – Saltern Cove – Goodrington Sands – Roundham Head – Paignton Harbour – Goodrington – Broadsands

Distance – 4.5 miles    Start time – 10am   Time taken – 2hrs 10mins  Highest Point – Not really one

Weather – Cloudy, drizzle at the end

© Crown copyright 2021 Ordnance Survey FL 2021 SF
Broadsands beach and all calm at the moment, there were quite a few people in the car park and lots of others getting coffee. I assume most wanted to be home before the heavy rain
Blue flag beach here and lots of huts, the coastal path heads up through those trees in the valley over there
Gig racing, or practice at least. You can see a pier over there which is the one protecting Brixham harbour
The Dartmouth Steam Railway runs from Torquay/Paignton down to Kingswear, where you jump on a boat to Dartmouth, sounds like a nice day out. Here’s the train heading past Broadsands
Looking down to the curved Broadsands beach and the pier at Brixham is more easily seen from up here
Looking the other way towards Torbay
Summer means overgrown paths and bracken
More of the train track
Heading down into Goodrington now and more beaches
Had never heard of a Global Geopark before, but this is one here at Saltern Cove
Goodrington Sands is ahead, you may also see a water park by the beach which is pretty good. I’m heading to the section of land sticking out which is called Roundham Head
On Roundham Head now looking back across Goodrington Sands
A couple of big cruise ships left in Torbay, there was 5 at one point but 3 must have employment now
In Roundham Head park there is this memorial and written section about Lieutenant Commander Harrison who must have been a resident of these parts. An unbelievable story of bravery in WW1.
The plaque memorial
Paignton harbour, plenty of people mingling around behind me looking for places to eat, some clearly holidaying before the schools break up
Paignton seafront and the pier, I figured this was a good spot to stop and turn as its an easy place to pick up the walk again heading for Torquay
Crossing the Dartmouth Steam railway track with Paignton station just over there
A bit of rain had started to drop but not much, however the cloud was certainly thickening ready for the deluge later that day and on my drive home.
The railway viaduct which is the one in the 4th photo of this post, the path under it leads to the beach at Broadsands
And here I am, not quite 5 miles but enough for today, the tide is out and so was England’s luck in the final. My luck was in as I sat in the car drinking coffee as the rain came down heavily, timed just right.

4 thoughts on “Broadsands to Paignton

  1. Pleased to see there’s so much green left – I’d imagined that by now it would all have been built over. Back in the 60s we used to put my cousin’s boat on the water at Elberry Cove. Not the most exciting bit of the coast path, but worth exploring/

    Liked by 1 person

    • If I’m honest I’m an average England fan, I struggle to hurl a grief at Harry Mcguire for 48 weeks of the season and then support him for the other 4! But even I was left a fair bit deflated by the ending. Best way to win a game, worst way to lose.

      Liked by 1 person

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