Cadover Bridge, Shaugh Bridge and Wigford Down

I thought I’d had my last evening walk a couple of weeks ago at Great Mis Tor  however I managed to squeeze another one in on a day when the rain was supposed to pour. Luckily for me the weather reporters were wrong and I enjoyed a walk in probably my most walked area on Dartmoor. i’ll come to this walk at least once a year, usually around Christmas, however I took advantage of a weather window and came here as its nearest to home. For those wishing to start walking on Dartmoor, or anywhere for that matter, this is as good a place as there is to start. You get a river, two bridges, a woodland path, downhill parts, uphill parts, an old railway and quarry industry, a tor, a rocky summit that was a hill fort and an area that gives a flavour of Dartmoor in Wigford Down. All that in 4 miles and owned by the National Trust. A brilliant place.

Start – Cadover parking
Route – North Wood – West Down – Shaugh BridgeDewerstoneCadworthy TorWigford DownCadover CrossCadover Bridge
Distance – 4 miles    Start time – 4pm     Time taken –  2hrs  Highest Point – Wigford Down 271 metres
Weather – Some sun, cool but no rain
© Crown copyright 2016 Ordnance Survey FL 2016 SF

© Crown copyright 2016 Ordnance Survey FL 2016 SF

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As I leave Cadover Bridge car park and enter North Woods the River Plym is loud and present on my right hand side. this whole area is owned by the National Trust

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This is the clay pipe path, for obvious reasons! Clay was carried along these pipes to the kilns at Shaugh Bridge. A nearby train station then took the goods to town (Plymouth) and beyond

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Sun dappled North Woods

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Out of North Woods and that’s Cadworthy Tor on the other side of the valley, I’ll be there in about 50 minutes

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From the same spot a view to the Dewerstone, a major climbing route in these parts. Devils Rocks above

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Going to the left

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I’m on the wooden bridge near Shaugh Bridge looking up the River Plym

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Shaugh Bridge, here the rivers Plym and Meavy meet

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This is the old cart track that leads up from Shaugh Bridge, the rocks ahead would have been a tor and became a quarry, stone from here went to build Blackfriars Bridge in London

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The incline, full carts of granite went down, pulling up the empty carts. Clever stuff

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The brake house, to stop the empty carts from heading into the River Meavy

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A glimpse over glorious Devon countryside, the valley below holds the River Meavy

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On Devils Rocks now, Dartmoor tors in the distance, Cox Tor on the left

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Sun shining on Cadover Bridge area with the Plym valley to the right. Left of photo is Cadworthy Tor my next destination

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To the south are views to Plymouth

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On Cadworthy Tor with Devils Rocks on the right and Plymouth Sound in the centre in the distance

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The top of the Dewerstone just visible left and below Devils Rocks

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Great Trowlesworthy Tor catches the sun as I walk to Wigford Down, Shell Top behind

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Past the Dartmoor ponies to Wigford Down

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Wigford Down cairn, Sheeps Tor above the cairn and Peek Hill to the left

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Watering hole Dartmoor style

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I’m heading down just right of the trees, Shell Top and Lee Moor dominate the background

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Cadover Cross and Cadover Bridge behind. This was an old abbots route from Tavistock to Plympton

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Sunset at Cadover Bridge

5 thoughts on “Cadover Bridge, Shaugh Bridge and Wigford Down

  1. I’m hoping to stop off in Dartmoor for a Cream Tea and a short walk on my way to weekend in Padstow in a few weeks. This looks like a good one. Any other recommendations for a couple of hours walk in some classic Dartmoor scenery.

    Like

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