Huntingdon Warren, Snowdon and Shipley Bridge

Don’t be fooled by the title, this isn’t the Welsh Snowdon. No this is the Dartmoor version, sat near to Ryders Hill on the southern moor. Its been over two years since I have been to Snowdon, that time I came from Ryders Hill and this time I chose to come from Avon Dam and over Huntingdon Warren. Now despite the lower altitude than the Welsh 3000 footer, this area needs respect, this area caught out an unprepared walker around a week ago, who called for help shortly after midnight after getting lost on Huntingdon Warren, suffering from hypothermia she was found around 3.15am. She was out without torches, maps, compasses or spare batteries for her phone or GPS. A lucky lady. It serves as a valuable reminder that these places deserve respect and thought. For me all was well, the sun shone, the walk was good and the ground not too boggy. In fact I quite like this part of the moor and I’m hoping the cold spell stays with us for a couple of weeks more!

Start – Shipley Bridge parking
Route – Shipley Bridge – Brentmoor HouseBlack Tor – River Avon – Avon Dam and Reservoir – Huntingdon CrossHuntingdon Warren – Snowdon – Pupers Hill – Abbots Way – Grippers HillShipley Tor – Shipley Bridge
Distance –  8 miles    Start time – Midday     Time taken –  4hrs 45mins   Highest Point – Snowdon 495metres
Weather – Blue skies, some cloud but lots of sunshine

© Crown copyright 2017 Ordnance Survey FL 2017 SF

The sun is shining at Shipley Bridge as I leave the car park

Just after the bridge this waterfall is always good value, even better after the wet weather we have had

The River Avon and Shipley Tor, my last one on the route, is up on the right

The remains of Brentmoor House

Behind Brentmoor House is Black Tor, and a lovely view up the Avon valley towards Avon Dam

Black Tor, looking to Shipley Tor (follow the wall up to it) and Brent Hill in the distance

Glorious at Avon Dam and reservoir

Heading around the reservoir I look back towards the dam, Grippers Hill on the left

That’s Huntingdon Warren back right, the River Avon can be seen below and I’m heading to a point between the two, where Huntingdon Cross sits

Frogspawn!! Bit early for that surely. Hope it can survive the cold weather as its forecast to hit zero for most of the coming week

Looking back from Huntingdon Cross

The wiggling River Avon heads into the reservoir. Eastern White Barrow can be seen up on the right

Redlake looking black and moody from the climb to Huntingdon Warren, the sun is spreading that way as the moor shows its yellow and brown colour of winter

The zoom lens is on now. Rippon Tor with Haytor behind from Huntingdon Warren

Lovely shot of Redlake

Leaving Huntingdon Warren with Snowdon left and Pupers Hill right. Heading for the former first

North from Snowdon, the bright sunshine in the far distance illuminates the area around Cut Hill

To the east you can see Rippon Tor to the right and the flat topped Hameldown to the left

Ryders Hill beyond the summit mound on Pupers Hill as I now start to head back in the direction of the car

Grippers Hill is on the left, that one is next up

Grippers Hill with the area around Shipley Tor straight ahead and Ugborough Beacon far back right

Looking back to Pupers Hill from Grippers Hill

Lots of tors here starting with Hameldown left, along to Chinkwell Tor and Honeybag Tor. Then Emsworthy Rocks and Rippon Tor to the left and plenty more in between

Heading to Shipley Tor I come across this upright stone with Huntingdon Warren above it in the distance. Eastern White Barrow to the left

Shipley Tor looking across to Black Tor above the trees. Some lovely light now as I reverse the photo from earlier in the walk

Ugborough Beacon from Shipley Tor. Now its just down and through the trees, however private land blocks the way, so follow the wall down to the River Avon head south 50 metres and hop across on the good stones

6 thoughts on “Huntingdon Warren, Snowdon and Shipley Bridge

  1. We had a beautiful walk up to the damn in February. Such a pretty area that we hadn’t explored before in all the years we had been coming to the Moors.

    Liked by 1 person

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