Whitehill Tor, Hawks Tor and a short drive

Well hello there Dartmoor, I have finally made it back, at least to this little pocket of it anyway, sitting right on the South West edge of the moor. Parts of this walk aren’t actually within the moor boundary (marked by the yellow line on the map below), but for me this is a great start after a month away. This walked involved a short drive from home (see what I did there) and actually was reasonably quiet, there were a few cars parked where I did and also down at Quick Bridge and I saw perhaps 10 people out walking but not too many. Along with some decent paths this walk gave some decent tors as well and provided a chance to reacquaint myself back with a bit of rock again. The weather was sunny all day and out of the wind, walking through the trees, up from Quick Bridge to the edge of the clay works, I was peeling of the layers. These went back on sharpish as the easterly, which has been an ever-present these last few days, hit me hard on Penn Moor. Even with this cold wind it was great to be back on the moor, even if it was just a short section, and hopefully I will be able to work out another walk around this area soon. There certainly appears to be more optimistic news appearing on our screens and even the odd happy story (Handforth meetings and Jackie Weaver anyone!!). Maybe, just maybe.

Start – Lee Moor parking

Route – Crownhill Tor – Headon China Clay workings – Quick Bridge – Cholwichtown – Penn Moor – Hanging StoneHexton TorBlackaton CrossSaddlesboroughHawks TorCollard TorCollard Tor Stone Row – Wotter – Blackalder TorWhitehill Tor – Lee Moor parking

Distance – 10 miles    Start time – 10.10am    Time taken – 4hrs 30mins Highest Point – Hanging Stone 340 metres

Weather – Sunny, some bits of cloud, very cold easterly but warmer out the wind

© Crown copyright 2020 Ordnance Survey FL 2020 SF
Starting out, lots of the views here are of and over the clay works here. Its not pleasant to look at but quite frankly after the last year it was bliss. Whitehill Tor is in the trees on the right
The Headon/Lee Moor clay works
Looking east as I walk towards Crownhill Tor. That’s Western Beacon over there, and the copse of trees on the hill mid distance is Hanger Down Clump
The hill over there holds Crownhill Tor, you can see Plymouth Sound from lots of this walk and its there on the right at the back
On Crownhill Tor now, the moor from Western Beacon on the right to Three Barrows to the left. The smoking chimney down there is part of Headon works, I’ll be there in a bit.
The mounds of the clay works with Penn Beacon behind from Crownhill Tor
The smoking chimney and a milky bluey lake of I not sure what it is. I was fascinated a bit walking around here as to what each bit did
Quick Bridge as I leave the clay works, head right a bit and then join the track up towards Penn Moor
The track up to Cholwichtown Farm and Penn Moor
Out of the wind here it was pretty warm and I was peeling off layers
The Lee Moor quarry, hopefully nature can rapidly take back those bare slopes
The smoking chimney and South Hams stretching away beyond
The track climbs around the Lee Moor quarry, you can stay down close ish to the edge, however I prefer to climb a couple of hundred metres to the main path which follows a leat towards Hexton Tor
The shapes of the clay mounds from the other side, seen in photo 6 above. I’m away from the edge of the clay works now and on the proper path. By this point the wind was hitting me hard so those layers went back on pronto.
On the path with Shell Top up to the left and Penn Beacon further right
The Hanging Stone, more of a leaning one really. It appears by the markings on it that it was probably a boundary marker originally. Proper tors behind with Great and Little Trowlesworthy Tors
I’m not heading over to the Trowlesworthy ones today, instead this is little Hexton Tor and this is will do me. The views are great from here when you look westerly rather than to my left and the clay works
The never seem to use this section of the pit so why not help it to regrow.
Know by locals as Long lake, and was used by the a model boating club for a long while before it was fenced off. Shell top and Penn Beacon at the back. Plenty of people had parked at Blackaton Cross and were heading past me up towards Trowlesworthy Tors
Blackaton Cross, the Trowlesworthy Tors are above and to the left of it. With Sheeps Tor and Peek Hill back left. Next I am heading along the road to the left, which ends up at Cadover Bridge, before that I will be branching off to the left through a clay works section and up towards Saddlesborough
Saddlesborough is just behind me and I’m on the slopes around the hut circles, which are marked by these odd star poles. The view at the back was deserving of a brew stop but the wind was Baltic so I carried on looking for shelter
Saddlesborough and views. love the shade being cast across Sheeps Tor, Peek Hill and the pointy peak of Leather Tor. Far distance back left is Great Mis Tor
Lee Moor, Shell Top and Penn Beacon from Saddlesborough across the clay works. Blue skies above still
The trig at Saddlesborough
A short walk from Saddlesborough is this fine tor. Hawks Tor gives a great view to Plymouth Sound and a nice balanced rock to make a good picture
Shaugh Prior and its church from Hawks Tor. Bodmin Moor is away in the distance
5 minutes from the last tor is this one. Collard Tor and again a view to Plymouth
The clay works is also in view
This is Collard Tor stone row, its only little so look first for the upright gate posts which can be seen as you leave Collard Tor
After Collard Tor I dropped down to the village of Wotter and then this road from Wotter towards Lee Moor and back to the car
Before reaching the village of Lee Moor there is this tor which is up an old cart incline on the left of the main road. If you see the old bus stop then head up left after that. This is Blackalder Tor
Outcrops lie both sides of the incline and the rocks are pretty big. One of the outcrops will give a view form the top to Plymouth if you summit it.
Back on the road. Lee Moor village is up the road on the left where the car is coming out.
Just before I reach the car I see Whitehill Tor on my right
Back at the start, Whitehill Tor is in those trees and can be seen peeking out the top. A fine and much needed walk back on or around the edge of Dartmoor. More please.

7 thoughts on “Whitehill Tor, Hawks Tor and a short drive

    • Lagoon, that was the word I was trying to think of when I wrote that blog!! It was so nice to get back to a bit of Dartmoor, in an area that gives you enough chances to see some tors and in the current situation, not drive too far :)!!

      Liked by 1 person

  1. It’s great to get out and feel the space and high level views from up on the moors and mountains. I’ve lost my blog mojo a bit over the last few weeks so I’m behind on both my own posts and other people’s. Hoping that the snippets of more positive news continue. My wife has just had her first jab (she’s a frontline health worker) although she did have a reaction to it, flu like symptoms for a couple of days. Look like mine will be due sometime towards the end of March.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Haven’t a clue about mine, I’m type 1 diabetic and mild asthma but haven’t had a clue as to when I will get it. I guess my age means I’m behind you olds!! (had to get that in!!). But you are right, the open spaces don’t half help, look at the stories under the headlines (Japan suicide rate due to Covid), these things need addressing in the current lockdown rules.

      Like

      • Cheeky! 😃
        It’s always been my point that whilst COVID-19 is the most important thing at the moment it’s not the ONLY thing and it concerns me how many people are quietly suffering from the effects of continual lockdown and lack of human contact.

        Like

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